Visits to our Centre

The Education Centre is set within a 30 acre site of mature woodland, meadow and ponds adjacent to our water treatment works. Since opening in 1998, we have welcomed and continue to welcome school visits from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 5.

There are many activities to choose from. They are listed below with a short description. These are for guidance only and it is always possible to adapt the programmes of work to match your requirements.

We offer the following:

General Information for Visits to the Education Centre

For further information about visits to the Education centre click here. You will find risk assessments, registers for visitors, a location map, our terms and conditions, information about the lunchbox challenge and information about voluntary contributions to WaterAid.

Students gain an understanding of how the water cycle works, how water supports life, where their tap water comes from, and an appreciation of why and how water should be conserved.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Pond Detectives
Curriculum links: Science
Students engage in a pond dipping activity where they will aim to identify the species they have caught and learn how water supports life.

2. Water Cycle Drama and Be Water Wise
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Students understand how the water cycle works through role play. They also take part in an interactive activity to understand which common household tasks use the most water as well as how they can reduce their personal water usage at home and at school.

3. Water Experiments (cleaning dirty water, what goes down the toilet)
Curriculum links: Science
Students ‘work scientifically’ to find out how water is cleaned and made safe to drink, and establish which items commonly cause blockages in waste water drains.

Students will find and identify, using simple keys, both pond creatures and minibeasts and have some understanding of how they have adapted to their habitat. They will gain an understanding of basic food chains and an appreciation of how all living things in our local ecosystem are connected.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Pond Detectives
Curriculum links: Science
Students engage in a pond dipping activity where they will aim to identify the species they have caught and use this information to determine the pollution levels of the pond.

2. Nature Safari
Curriculum links: Science
Students will search for minibeasts and ‘natural treasure’ in a woodland/grassland habitat, then identify what they have found using simple keys.

3. Identity Detectives and Food Chain Challenge
Curriculum links: Science
Students will learn how to be scientists by using identification keys, as well as learning about basic food chains.

Students gain an understanding of where their tap water comes from, common pollutants found in water and how they are removed, and an appreciation of why and how water should be conserved.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Water Treatment Works Tour
Curriculum links: STEM
Students visit the Clay Lane water treatment works to understand where their (tap) water comes from and how it gets cleaned. They get an appreciation of the scientific processes involved in getting water from ‘source to tap’ at an operational treatment site.

2. Be Water Wise
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Students gain knowledge of the amount of water that common activities use. They will also learn practical ways they can reduce their personal water usage at home and at school.

Plus a choice of one of the following activities:

A. Water in the Developing World
Curriculum links: Geography, Citizenship
Students take part in an experiential ‘search for water’ to identify the similarities and differences between the UK and developing countries, when accessing safe clean drinking water. They consider how water is used globally, some of the issues faced by people in developing countries and think about ways that they can help make a difference.

B. Water Experiments (cleaning dirty water, what goes down the toilet, pollution pathways)
Curriculum links: Science
Students ‘work scientifically’ to find out how water is cleaned and made safe to drink, the source of common pollutants in water sources and their own personal impact on this, and establish which items commonly cause blockages in waste water drains.

Students gain an understanding of where water comes from, how it gets from source to tap, how rivers work and the impact humans can have on their environment, as well as an appreciation of why and how water should be conserved.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Water Treatment Works Tour
Curriculum links: STEM
Students visit the Clay Lane water treatment works to understand where their (tap) water comes from and how it gets cleaned. They get an appreciation of the scientific processes involved in getting water from ‘source to tap’ at an operational treatment site.

2. Be Water Wise
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Students gain knowledge of the amount of water that common activities use. They will also learn practical ways they can reduce their personal water usage at home and at school.

3. Rivers and their Catchments
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Using an interactive 12 metre river model, students gain knowledge of how a river functions within the water cycle as well as within the river catchment system. They will also learn how and why rivers need to be managed, human impacts on rivers (both positive and negative) and how they can become more responsible in caring for their own river catchment.

Students gain an understanding of the STEM behind the water industry, where their tap water comes from, and develop an appreciation of why and how water should be conserved.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Water Treatment Works Tour
Curriculum links: STEM
Students visit the Clay Lane water treatment works to understand where their (tap) water comes from and how it gets cleaned. They get an appreciation of the scientific processes involved in getting water from ‘source to tap’ at an operational treatment site.

2. Be Water Wise
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Students gain knowledge of the amount of water that common activities use. They will also learn practical ways they can reduce their personal water usage at home and at school.

Plus a choice of one of the following activities:
A. Water Flow Investigation
Curriculum links: STEM
Students experiment with a range of equipment to investigate the basic laws of physics that govern the flow of water through a pipe. They will need to apply their own STEM skills to work through the investigation.

B. The Water Supply Stress Test
Curriculum links: STEM, Geography, Citizenship
This activity allows students to consider the complexity of water related issues within a local and global context. They will take part in an interactive game to help them understand the impact that humans can have on their own water sources, and identify ways that everyone can play a part to help protect this precious natural resource.

C. Water Supply Challenge
Curriculum links: STEM
This game challenges teams to design, build and test a water supply network, simulating a real life engineering project.

Students will find and identify both pond and woodland minibeasts and have some understanding of how they have adapted to their habitat. They will learn how all species are interdependent and an appreciation of how they must look after their local catchment area to preserve the ecosystem.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Pond Detectives
Curriculum links: Science
Students engage in a pond dipping activity where they will aim to identify the species they have caught and use this information to determine the pollution levels of the pond.

2. Nature Safari
Curriculum links: Science
Students will find and identify minibeasts found in their natural habitat. They will also look at the trees in these habitats and have an understanding of how minibeasts and trees have adapted.

3. Food Webs and Pollution Patrol
Curriculum links: Science, Geography, Citizenship
Students learn about food chains and webs, understanding the importance of the sun and green plants. They will engage in an interactive ‘food web challenge’, which showcases how every living organism is connected. The pollution game will demonstrate how everyone is responsible for protecting their local catchment.

Students gain an understanding of the the STEM behind the water industry, scientific processes involved in getting clean and safe drinking water to their taps, where water comes from, common pollutants found in water and how they are removed, and an appreciation of why and how water should be conserved.

The day consists of three sessions:
1. Water Treatment Works Tour
Curriculum links: STEM
Students visit the Clay Lane water treatment works to understand where their (tap) water comes from and how it gets cleaned. They get an appreciation of the scientific processes involved in getting water from ‘source to tap’ at an operational treatment site.

2. Be Water Wise
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Students gain knowledge of the amount of water that common activities use. They will also learn practical ways they can reduce their personal water usage at home and at school.

Plus a choice of one of the following activities:
A. Water Supply Challenge
Curriculum links: STEM
This game challenges teams to design, build and test a water supply network, simulating a real life engineering project.

B. Water Flow Investigation
Curriculum links: STEM
Students experiment with a range of equipment to investigate the basic laws of physics that govern the flow of water through a pipe. They will need to apply their own STEM skills to work through the investigation.

C. Water Experiments (cleaning dirty water, what goes down the toilet, pollution)
Curriculum links: Science
Students ‘work scientifically’ to find out how water is cleaned and made safe to drink, the source of common pollutants in water sources and their own personal impact on this, and establish which items commonly cause blockages in waste water drains.

Students will gain an understanding of how water resources are managed within the water industry. Depending on the choice of sessions,they will focus on either river catchment management, water quality, water supply management or water treatment processes and conservation.

The day consists of two sessions. You may choose any two of the following activities:
A. Rivers and their Catchments
Curriculum links: Geography, Science, Citizenship
Using an interactive 12 metre river model, students gain knowledge of how a river functions within the water cycle as well as within the river catchment system. They will also learn how and why rivers need to be managed, human impacts on rivers (both positive and negative) and how people, industries and organisations can become more responsible in caring for their own river catchment.

B. Fresh Water Ecology
Curriculum links: Science, Geography
Students engage in a pond dipping activity where they will aim to identify the species they have caught and use this information to determine the pollution levels of the pond. They will also gain an insight into the scientific processes involved in managing a river catchment and monitoring water quality.

C. The Water Supply Stress Test
Curriculum links: STEM, Geography, Citizenship
This activity allows students to consider the complexity of water related issues within a local and global context. They will take part in an interactive game to help them understand the impact that humans can have on their own water sources, the implications of demand and unpredictable rainfall patterns on a limited water supply and identify ways that everyone can play a part to help protect this precious natural resource.

D. Water Treatment Works Tour & Be Water Wise
Curriculum links: STEM, Geography, Citizenship
Students visit the Clay Lane water treatment works to understand where their (tap) water comes from and how it gets cleaned. They get an appreciation of the scientific processes involved in getting water from ‘source to tap’ at an operational treatment site. They will also gain knowledge of the amount of water that common activities use and learn practical ways they can reduce their personal water usage at home and at school.

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